Cognitive dysfunction reflected in schizophrenia healthcare costs By Eleanor McDermid, Senior medwireNews Reporter Cognitive dysfunction has indirect and direct effects on healthcare costs in sufferers with schizophrenia, research suggests. The data result from a previously published randomised controlled trial evaluating 40 periods of cognitive remediation therapy with treatment as usual in 85 schizophrenia sufferers. Receiving cognitive remediation therapy instead of usual treatment predicted change in verbal working storage, but none of the cognitive variables were considerably associated with change in healthcare costs. Related StoriesNew initiative aims to collect samples from schizophrenia individuals over the globeUnderstanding how schizophrenia affects workings of the brainResearchers examine neuroanatomical signature of schizophrenia in different ethnic groupsThey then looked at a single latent cognition factor representing change in all the cognitive assessments administered.The contract provides money to validate the brand new freeze-dried manufacturing procedure and the linked pre-clinical and clinical research to aid the advanced advancement of a freeze-dried edition of IMVAMUNE. The bottom 12 months funding symbolizes 33 percent of the full total contract value, accompanied by four extra years of optional financing, which are triggered by the completion of pre-determined specialized milestones. These freeze-dried advancement activities will become performed in parallel to the licensure actions of the existing liquid-frozen IMVAMUNE formulation beneath the RFP-3 agreement. Related StoriesGHIT Fund invests $10.7 million to combat malaria, TB, leishmaniasis and dengueResearchers reveal why malaria vaccine provides only moderate safety among vaccinated childrenAustralian experts find a way to improve cross-shielding capabilities of influenza A vaccineThe contract will not affect the business’s expectations for this year’s 2009 full calendar year results.